TA-DA! Finally, the long awaited beef-barley soup, as promised many days ago. I call this soup Zuppa Patrizia, named after my mother. Not because she makes it (far from it, she’s still trying to figure out which appliance in her kitchen is the stove), but because she loves it so. So much that she always wants a cut of every batch, and since she’s such a loyal fan (and wields guilt quite effectively), I very happily make sure she always gets her share – like a tithe!

So without further ado:

This soup is made in 2 stages. Stage one is homemade broth, stage two, at least one day later, is soup made from that broth. This recipe will also be posted in 2 stages (hence the post title). I am very tricky and am not above using any means to get you to keep clicking back to my blog, but enough about me and more about homemade broth…….

There is really no substitute for making your own broth, it is the only way to control the seasoning in your finished dishes. All commercially available broths that I’ve managed to find, even those labeled “stock,” are basically cans of salt. When you figure the per “portion” sodium, allow for reduction in cooking, and then for actual serving size, you are eating a week’s worth of salt at one sitting. Never mind the artificial flavors, colors and preservatives. Making your own broth is really easy and definitely worth the trouble.

Broth needs to be made at least a day prior to use so that it can be properly and easily de-scummed and de-fatted (more on that later down the page) and also so that the flavor has a chance to “bloom.” It can also be made as far in advance as you like and then frozen for future use if need be. Trust me, I’m all about the “easy.”

Tip: You may want to get into the habit of saving and freezing any bones from roasts for future broths – leftover bones with whatever attached meat give additional layers of flavor that raw bones do not.

Cast of Characters:

Cast of Characters from Only in Maine's new production of "BROTH" - the new must-eat hit of the season!

Cast of Characters - Broth

 

Beef soup bones (at least 2) and any other beef bones.

4 or 5 brown onions, halved, whole if small.

4 or 5 celery stalks, cleaned and cut in thirds.

4 or 5 large carrots, cleaned but not peeled, cut in thirds

Optional: a few bay leaves, a few sprigs of fresh thyme, a few allspice berries.

 

I happened to have a leek in the fridge that was close to past its prime, so I cleaned and tossed that in as well. I’m a big believer in using what you have.

Throw everything into a stockpot and fill to within a few inches from the top with cold water. You can leave  any clean brown skins on the onions, which will supposedly add a little color to the broth, but this is not necessary. 

Everyone into the pool....

Everyone into the pool....

Put the pot over a medium flame until it boils, then turn it down and let it simmer for a minimum of 3 or more hours and up to “as long as you like.” The idea is to leach every last ounce of flavor from the beef, the bone, and the marrow. When the bones are removed, they should look like they’ve been bleached by a desert sun for weeks and everything else in the pot should be falling apart.

For those of you that have a dog, well, he’ll be very lucky tonight! Note that the only bones recommended as safe for dogs are the big soup bones (thigh), discard any others, as they can splinter and severely injure your dog. Enough about dogs. Back to the broth.

Strain the solids from the liquids. Do not taste the broth, do not try to season the broth, and do not be alarmed that it looks like greasy dirty dishwater – this is what you want. Let it cool, and refrigerate (I place the pot in my unheated garage with outside temps below 32 degrees). You cannot skip this overnight step. Because the next day, when you remove the pot from the fridge (or your frozen garage), all the fat will have risen to the top bringing any scum with it and will have formed a nice soft crust that you can lift off like a loose layer of wax, using a slotted spatula. Toss this layer in your fat jar for later disposal (when it gets to room temperature it will liquefy so probably not best to toss directly into the trash unless you are absolutely sure that your bag won’t develop a leak). If any bits of fat or scum are left, skim off with a spoon. You will end up with a broth that is virtually completely fat free with very little effort. I told you, I’m all about the “easy.”

After de-fatting, back on the stove it goes over medium heat until it comes to a boil, and then reduce heat to medium low and let simmer until it reduces by half or you end up with about 8 to 10 cups of liquid. It will darken a bit as it becomes more concentrated.

Voila, beef broth. It will smell better than it tastes. This is fine. Remember that this is basically just watered down extracted beef flavor with virtually no seasonings – so far not even one milligram of salt. This is what you want, don’t worry. You will be adding all the seasonings while making the soup. Which will have to wait until tomorrow, after all your fat rises to the top, solidifies in the cold, and you remove it with a slotted spatula. Isn’t it too bad that this fat removal method doesn’t work on humans?

 

See you tomorrow!

Any questions or need clarification on the finer points? Leave your question in the comments section and I’ll get back to you.

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