Yesterday I posted my recipe for homemade beef broth as a base for the soup recipe I’m posting today. By now you’ve made the broth, you’ve let it sit in the fridge overnight, defatted/descummed and reduced it by half and are now ready for the next step…So lets make soup! 

Cast of Characters:

Now appearing in Only in Maine's production of "Soup" the new must-eat hit of the season!

Now appearing in Only in Maine's production of "Soup" the new must-eat hit of the season!

1/4 cup or less of olive oil

4-5 large sweet onions and 2 medium brown onions

5 stalks of celery* and 5 carrots, chopped small

1/4 tsp salt and 2 large bay leaves

1 lb. lean stir fry beef (optional) cut in small cubes

Parmigiano Reggiano rinds**

1/2 cup Marsala wine

 

Not shown in the photo is the pre-cooked barley and 8-10 cups of your homemade broth.

I use quick cooking barley (15 min), make the whole box in advance, and then freeze whatever I’m not using right away in quart size Ziplocs for later use in other dishes – which I’ll also probably be showing you how to make, but some other time. Use however much or little barley you like in the soup (see photo below for reference). 

You want the broth simmering hot when you are ready to use it so have it in a pot on the stove over a low flame while you are preparing the soup.

Add a small drizzle of olive oil to the bottom of a large soup pot, peel and cut all the onions into very thin half rings, toss into the pot, drizzle a little more olive oil over the top and sauté over medium low heat. You need very little oil here, the onions will give off a lot of their own liquid. Yes these are A LOT of oinons:

Yes, these are ALOT of oinons.

Yes, these are ALOT of oinons.

But do not freak out. They will melt down to nothing given time and heat and pressure (as in “hurry up and melt darn it!”).

Add a pinch or two of salt to draw out the onion juices. Cook slowly, stirring frequently until wilted all the way down and transparent and a soft beige-brown. Sauteeing the onions is the longest process here, everything else is fairly quick, so make sure your broth is simmering at this point.

Add the meat and sauté until browned. Add chopped carrot and celery and sauté just a bit more until just starting to soften (2 minutes, maybe). Seperately combine the 1/4 cup Marsala wine with about 3/4 cup of your simmering beef broth and use this mixture to deglaze the soup pot, scraping up all of the delicious brown bits on the bottom of the pan. If you don’t mix the wine with the broth first the sweet wine will evaporate and burn immediately before you have a chance to draw your next breath. And if you burn the soup at this point you will be mighty unhappy. Trust me. And don’t ask how I know this, I’ll burst into tears.

Add the rest of the heated broth, and stir. Add bay leaf,Parmigiano rinds, celery leaf*, and cook for another 30 – 45 minutes to allow the flavors to meld skimming off any scum or fat with a spoon. Remove from heat, let cool, and refrigerate overnight to allow the flavors to develop. DO NOT EAT NOW even though you might think it tastes pretty good. You’ve come this far, trust me and wait.

Voila` Zuppa Patrizia!

Voila` Zuppa Patrizia!

The next day, to serve, bring to room temp over low flame then heat on medium low ’til hot (not boiling), add cooked barley, stir and let heat through. Taste and adjust seasoning.

When all is hot and just at a simmer, serve it up with some toasty crusty peasanty or whole grain bread and a nice salad. The soup should be rich in flavor, fairly low in fat, and will warm your toes! And it will be incredibly delicious – so delicious that you will thank your trusting stars that you waited overnight before eating. Be sure to avoid the Parmigiano rind and bay leaves when serving. When you do serve your Zuppa Patrizia, it will look like this (see picture above).  

Then within minutes, this is what happens:

All gone.....!

You should be able to feed 6 for dinner and still have leftovers. This soup is very dense and filling. To recap: Day one, several hours simmering broth. Day two, a few hours reducing broth. To make soup: at least an hour to reduce onions properly, another 30 – 45 minutes cooking once soup is put together plus prep time. Total: Too long for any other recipe but totally worth it for this one. Anyone you feed with it will be your slave for life.

*Reserve any celery leaf whole with their little stems, and add them to the soup with the Parmigiano rind and the bay leaf. Avoid any larger pieces when serving. Adds wonderful flavor.

**Note on the Parmigiano. Only cheese labeled “Parmigiano Reggiano” is the real thing. Anything else is a poor substitute and not worth buying. Really. If you buy that stuff in a green can, skip this recipe altogether and just buy a can of beef barley soup and be done with it. The difference between Parmigiano and that stuff in the green can is that Parmigiano is cheese, and the stuff in the green can is, well, not.

Special Tip: Don’t buy Parmigiano already grated, it goes stale immediately – when you pay that much for cheese, buying it pre-grated is just a low down dirty shame. A whole chunk will last about forever in your fridge, and the best part is that you end up with a rind which you can then save in a Ziploc baggie in the fridge. Add one or two rinds to the pot when making soups, stews, and sauces. The rind doesn’t melt away (it will need to be fished out before serving or avoided when dishing out), but will soften during cooking, imparting the most incredible flavor to whatever dish you are making. It also adds salt, which is why there is almost no salt added in the making of this soup – so please adjust any recipe to which you add a rind accordingly. Any hard cheese rind can be used in this manner.

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